The Broken Window

The Broken Window by Jeffery Deaver was the last book I read. Considering the page count and my ever-busy daily schedule it took me a while to make it to the end. 

Nevertheless, although fiction it gave me a log to think about. It’s side story is about all the data created digitally and stored in a secret (and supposedly safe) place. When you think about it, there really is a lot of data generated digitally, from one’s credit card payments, GPS trackings of outdoor workouts, web accounts of e-stores etc. 

The story, on the other hand, is a complex page turner, and a great way to pass that extra time in the afternoons. I loved those extra quiet moments I had and spent most of them out on the small balcony, catching warm spring sun and simply relaxing.

I haven’t started a new book since then. I need to finish a work-related project and am focusing on literature from my proffesion. It’s amazing how quickly my brain lost (or displaced) knowledge I don’t use during my daily routine of baby feeding and changing dirty dipers. And I am being optimistic, my current reading list involves a lot of material on statistics and radiobiology.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

My third book (The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot) this year has been on my reading wish list for a long time. I wasn’t sure on buying it, so I had to wait my turn to borrow it at the library.

So, after a couple of weeks reading this biographical novel on the origin of HeLa cells, made me look and think differently about cell culture. If you’re a biologist or not, doing cancer research or not, this is a novel that gives you a whole new perspective on the development of medicine in the 20th century. What’s more, it’s written in a popular language easily understandanle also to people outside cell culture labs. Definitely something I’d recommend to put on your wish list.

First book of the year

It’s been less than three weeks and I already finished reading the first book in 2017. Although I’m sure I won’t be able to keep up this pace, I’m happy I found some time to sit down and relax.

James Patterson is one of my favourite writers and his books are always page-turners. Private No. 1 Suspect was no exception. It took me more than a week to go from the first to the last page, however I wasn’t able to read every night. If you’re wondering about the book, it follows his recipe – a male PI, two or three different plots to follow, a pretty female for a dash of romance (less than usually which is a plus for me) and a happy end. An easy book to get your mind off your every day stress

A visit to Amsterdam

As I’m getting ready for my next business trip, I realized I haven’t finished my post on the last trip. I spent 5 days in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, in early September.  I didn’t have much time for sightseeing, but since this was my second time there, I simply enjoyed the scenery and warm weather. I discovered some interesting bookshops, and brought home lots of new books to read in the near future.

Before I go to sleep

Since I can remember my going-to-bed habbit was reading a book. Lately I’ve been either too busy or too tired to even open a book, so the feeling of holding a book in my hands after approximately 2 months was great. Even more so, as I finished the book in three evenings. James Patterson’s NYPD Red might have around 350 pages, but being a true page-turner it’s a perfect book to take your mind off your busy everyday. Not to mention the cup of tea and home-made chocolate cookies with the book.

Brick-built bookends

My latest MOC is this set of bookends. I wanted to try something different, and made first a tropical island, followed by a buildings facade. The conection between them are books, all brick-built. The message I wanted to convey is that by entering the world of fiction or fantasy can take you to special place even if the entry point seems as dull as this buildings facade.

Bookends

Shroud for a Nightingale

The last book I read was P. D. James’ Shroud for a Nightingale. It’s a novel from the Adam Dalgliesh mistery series. It was my forth P. D. James’ novel (I also read The Lighthouse, Cover Her Face, and The Private Patient), and clearly, she’s becoming one of my favourite authors.

The story takes place in the Nightingale House, where young women are learning the nursing skills. The plot complicates with sudden deaths of two of the students, and that calls for Dalgliesh’ expertise to identify the killer. One of my first association about this novel were that it actually had a similar feel to Agatha Christie’s settings (situated somewhere in the English country side, in a partially isolated community with medical skills and intriguing past of the characters). As a non-native reader, I was excited to read proper English. Lately, most of the English literature was writen in American English, and the difference here was outstanding. Considering the language, there were plenty of unknown expressions, and this was for me an important part of reading experience. It brought me back about twenty years to my first books read in English (A. Christie’s), and the ultimate joy of great misteries. To conclude, P. D. James is now officially on my favourites list, and I’m looking forward reading more of her novels.

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